By Lynne Elkins

Lynne explores how magma is made by studying the mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic makeup of igneous rocks. She also teaches geology, plays music, dances, and hangs out with her fabulous fluffy pets.

  1. This very nice scientist Nicole knows wanted to help put Deathquakenami in perspective. She mostly just made it worse. Also, Nicole wants to get even more mileage out of that Space Needle image she created.

    This post is generously sponsored by Elliot Norwood, to whom Deathquakenami presents a clear and present danger.

    Everything on Earth is always moving: air currents move across the surface and up and down and in

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  2. As The Toast searches for its one true Gal Scientist, we will be running a ton of wonderful one-off pieces by female scientists of all shapes and sizes and fields and education levels, which we are sure you will enjoy. They’ll live here, so you can always find them. 

    Last year, in response to this (really badly written) article and its title (Earth’s Water May Be Older

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  3. Lynne Elkins' previous work for The Toast can be found here.

    Today, I am not here to talk to you about science*. Instead, I would like to share a truth that you may not have fully realized, which is that the ocean is a horrifying place full of monsters.

    You might be thinking, “But I always wanted to be a marine biologist! I love dolphins!” And to be fair, dolphins

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  4. As The Toast searches for its one true Gal Scientist, we will be running a ton of wonderful one-off pieces by female scientists of all shapes and sizes and fields and education levels, which we are sure you will enjoy. They’ll live here, so you can always find them. Most recently: In Which We Learn About Endosymbiosis. For most of my dissertation, I spent easily half of my work hours staring down a microscope with…

    44 comments