Posts tagged “publishing”

  1. Everyone can feel good about this! Non-profiteers, lyric essayists, essayed lyricists, people who care about publishing but don't live in New York City, New Yorkers (you can afford to be magnanimous! You have all the stuff New York has in it!), everyone who's mad at Amazon, punching enthusiasts, 41-year-olds, Minnesotans, the scrappy, award winners, and so on: Graywolf Press, a nonprofit outfit in St. Paul, Minnesota...has been winning for a while. Over the past few…

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  2. When it comes to literary daydreaming, I’m not one for those imaginary dinner parties, with artisanally curated assemblages of Great Authors of All Time swapping deft bon mots between courses. Mostly, I’m sure, I’d end up worrying about Emily Dickinson’s food allergies and regretting having brought Nathanael West and Jacqueline Susann into the same room (hey, you choose your Great Authors, I’ll choose mine). Also, I don’t have a lot of chairs. I’m a copy…

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  3. This conversation first appeared in Scratch magazine’s Q4 2014 issue. Read more Scratch about the business of being a writer here. In the publishing industry, most of the gatekeepers come from a place of race and class privilege. How does this skewed power dynamic affect the careers of writers of color? Scratch invited our panelists to have a conversation about their experiences as people who walk through those “gates” every day. Novelist and essayist…

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  4. OH, MAN. Doing book design work looks ROUGH.

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  5. Grégoire Delacourt is the saddest Frenchman in the world. He wrote a book that is not about Scarlett Johansson, and Scarlett Johansson took him to court for it. Delacourt told Le Figaro that he chose to include Johansson in his novel because she worked as a stand-in for today’s archetype of female beauty, and that using her name allowed him to make a statement about the way modern romantic fantasies are affected by the…

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  6. Diversity is a hot topic in publishing right now. Though many have been working toward a more diverse and equitable literary landscape for years, there has been a significant increase in the number and frequency of conversations surrounding the topic in the past few months. Arguably, the tipping point came when independent children’s publisher Lee and Low released their “Diversity in Children’s Books” infographic in June 2013. Based on the report and statistics…

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  7. 1. Choose an excerpt from your translated novel. Practice it out loud. Realize that you do not understand 10% of your own text, even though you’ve been living in Germany for the past six years. Look up the words you don’t know in the dictionary and make small, inscrutable notes on the page. Read through again, stumbling more than the first time, due to the small, inscrutable notes. 2. Board train to the book fair…

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  8. At the start of 2013–years ago, really–I started Sorry House. Imagined as a community collective (I was, after all, a year younger) and re-imagined several times with several different names, like high schoolers starting a band, it quickly became a very self-driven thing. I’ve rejected a lot and assimilated more. I’ve seen my books go from PDF to featured in Vice, Paper, Nylon, and The Rumpus, from my desk to the windows of McNally…

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  9. Lately I never leave the house without my armor. Maybe it’s because of my passion for social issues and cultural representation, or to paraphrase the clinically sharp bell hooks, the dismantling of our white supremacist society that teaches black folks to internalize racism, has become an easy target for chauvinists. Some people of the patriarchal army would believe that I actively place myself in the role of the victim. (How many times have I heard…

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  10. Andrew Wylie, the literary agent with murder in his eyes, can say things that other men cannot, and we will love him for it. He's a tramp But they love him Breaks a new heart Ev'ry day What can be said about the Wylie Coyote? By rights we ought to hate him. By appearances alone we ought to surround him with a group of smiling, red-mouthed women and invite him to Particicution. Such needless…

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  11. Previous installments in this series can be found here. Have a question for Ginger? Ask her! What do you think about the usefulness of joining something like QueryTracker to find an agent? Cold-calling and blindly submitting seems futile and terrifying in equal measure.--Allison QueryTracker is helpful; Publishers Marketplace is probably more helpful. Agents and editors use PM to report our deals and keep tabs on who is buying what. It is…

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  12. I was twelve years old and three books into the Dollanganger quartet when I discovered that the author—who was still “writing” new books, as she continues doing to this day—had died four years earlier. Already a committed V.C. Andrews fan for life, I took this as such a personal tragedy that when our Hebrew school class was encouraged to donate a tree in Israel in memory of someone we’d loved and lost, I proudly inscribed…

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  13. In the spring of 1978, I landed a job as a senior editor at Pocket Books, though I was hardly qualified for the position. The publisher at the time, Peter Mayer, was committed to hiring bright young people on the cheap. Though I’d never before acquired a book, I was now able to acquire not only hardcover reprints but also paperback originals. Flowers in the Attic was my first.

    V.C. Andrews' 98-page novel had…

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  14. Previous installments in this series can be found here. Have a question for Ginger? Ask her! Is there an optimal season or month to submit queries for novels?--Jacqueline Every agent has their own frantic time and quiet time--or, times when they are not rushing through query letters, and times when they are. For me personally, the week before and the week after the Bologna and Frankfurt Book Fairs would qualify as busy. (The week I’m…

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  15. “Rowling’s authorship was revealed by The Sunday Times after it investigated how a first-time author “with a background in the army and the civilian security industry” could write such an assured debut novel.” You’d think that a city as grey and hopeless as London wouldn’t be able to produce the high-watt sunlight that really makes you regret your high-proof mistakes. Maybe that’s why you can’t throw a crumpled-up newspaper without hitting a drunk in The…

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