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Deal 1909

Remember, “this category only covers animal disguises worn as part of a traditional folk custom or seasonal observance.

It does not include catsuits, fursuits or animal costumes worn for promotional, advertising or play purposes, or as mascots at baseball, football or other sporting events, or as part of a theatrical performance.”

Hoodening:

“I remember as a child being taken out on Christmas Eve to the High Street in Deal where the shops would be open very late, and it was the only time Deal children were allowed out in the evening, parents were very strict. As we would be looking at the lighted shops, and listening to the people selling their wares, a horrible growl, and a long horse’s face would appear, resting on our shoulder and when one looked round, there would be a long row of teeth snapping at us with its wooden jaws. It was frightening for a child. Usually, there would be a man leading the horse, with a rope, and another covered over with sacks or blankets as the horse.”

That’s not so bad, it’s just a horse –

hoodenn

“I found they begin the festivities of Christmas by a curious procession: a party of young people procure the head of a dead horse, which is affixed to a pole about four feet in length; a string is affixed to the lower jaw; a horse-cloth is also attached to the whole, under which one of the parts gets, and by frequently pulling the string, keeps up a loud snapping noise, and is accompanied by the rest of the party, grotesquely habited, with hand-bells; they thus proceed from house to house, ringing their bells, and singing carols and songs; they are commonly gratified with beer and cake, or perhaps with money. This is called, provincially, a Hodening.”

ahahaha enjoyyyyy, definitely do not click on the Whittlesea Straw Bear!!!

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