By Kate Angus

Kate Angus is a founding editor of Augury Books. She has received the A Room of Her Own Foundation’s Orlando prize for Creative Nonfiction, Southeastern Review’s Narrative Nonfiction award, and residencies at the Betsy Hotel’s Writer’s Room in South Beach, the Wildfjords trail in Westfjords, Iceland, and the BAU Institute in Otranto, Italy. Her work has appeared in Indiana Review, Subtropics, Court Green, Verse Daily, The Awl, The Rumpus, Best New Poets 2010 and Best New Poets 2014. A former Writer in Residence at Interlochen Arts Academy, she currently lives in New York. 

  1. 1. The Hunger Spirit Like many children of the 1980s, I first encountered the wendigo in Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark when Alvin Schwartz recounts the tale of a Canadian hunting guide lured away from his campsite. His companion searches for him, but finds only the guide’s tracks in the snow. The footprints are normal at first, but soon further and further apart as if the guide were being pulled along by something much…

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  2. In The Book of Nightmares, helplessness must often appear--how terrifying to be aware and immobilized, lying entombed below ground as the earth thuds on your wooden coffin roof, unable to speak or scream. Or to live in the diving bell where the world around you is all ocean and movement, but you cannot join in: shiny slips of fish quicksilvering past as sharks bare sharp teeth jagged as bright coral reefs beside the long undulations…

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  3. 1. A Kate is a key In March, I learned that my name was used as slang for “skeleton key” by thieves in the early eighteen hundreds. I had been reading a crime novel about New York where the detectives referred to Jenny, a minor character, as “a kate.” I hastened to A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English to find out if this usage of my name meant that Jenny was beautiful, hideous, a…

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